Category Archives: architecture

Can you take pictures of property?

I see advertisements quite frequently for property photographer/floorplanners and wonder why there is always a requirement. How difficult is it to take optimal pictures of somebody’s home? Are the beds made? Are the cupboards closed? Is the floor clear? Have you made sure not to get your reflection in the mirror?…These pics were taken as my sister is selling up. She asked me to take the photos as some of the photography she’d seen online seemed rather hit and miss. Then I looked at my local agents photos and realised that not all of them know how to take a light clear photo at all….

property photography by simon bennett

property photography by simon bennett

property photography by simon bennett

 

property photography by simon bennett

property photography by simon bennett

property photography by simon bennett

property photography by simon bennett

property photography by simon bennett

property photography by simon bennett

One exhibition that is a must-see

A break from my normal posting here with good reason. A friend of mine was visiting London and suggested we visit the 50 years of London architecture exhibition at the University of Westminster. I went, and to be perfectly frank I thought I’d be there no more than a couple of hours at most. How wrong I was. In fact three of us met and we were there all day. This amazing exhibition should be visited with friends, preferably those who have strong opinions on contemporary architecture.

This expansive exhibition, set within the cavernous basement at the University starts out with the brutalism of the sixties and works up to the present day. The photographs are large and in many cases beautifully shot. Yes, there are buildings included that I don’t believe warrant inclusion- but we all had differing opinions on these. This is no sniffy gallery with attendants staring at you impassively or asking you to be quiet; this exhibition demands debate and for the first time in ages I left a gallery space having felt I had just witnessed something very worthwhile. If you have a chance go and see it, – it’s on for another week.

50 years of London architecture exhibition at Westminster University

50 years of London Architecture, University of Westminster, Marylebone Road- opposite Baker Street tube station.

Six Photographers Test Their Right to Shoot in London

As a photographer I have been stopped by security men who think they have the right to stop people taking photographs in public spaces. As they represent the people who own the buildings they believe they have the right to own the landscape. They don’t, and as this excellent video shows, when the police are called the security men’s argument is nullified.
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On June 21, 2011, non-profit organization Shoot Experience sent out six photographers to various parts of London to see the current state of photographers’ rights.

Some used tripods, some went hand held, one set up a 5 x 4.

All were instructed to keep to public land and photograph the area as they would on a normal day. The event aimed to test the policing of public and private space by private security firms and their reaction to photographers.

The result? Every one of the photographers was confronted at least once, and in three cases the police were called.

Source:
http://www.petapixel.com/2011/07/20/six-photographers-test-their-right-to-shoot-in-london/

Winter sun on Wobbly Bridge

Wobbly Bridge, or to use its official name ‘Millenium Bridge’ was opened about the same time as Hungerford Bridge – two new footpaths across the Thames, the latter replacing an older and rather beaten up structure. However Millenium bridge was an all new route from St Paul’s to the Tate Modern, and had a few problems when it first opened – hence its nickname. It may not be as obviously spectacular as Hungerford Bridge, but in the winter afternoon sun its geometric detail came alive and I had to record it…

millenium bridge in the february sunshine

Cloisters at Iona

Time out in Scotland, and I visited Iona to see the abbey- the base of the Iona community. My father was staying there for a week and I was able to spend some time with him there. Although a monastery was founded in 563 AD by Columba much of this abbey was restored to its present state in the 20th century.

cloisters at iona